Lezing

Minds on Music: Artists with Attitudez

Kim Dankoor, PhD
Woensdag 27 oktober , 12:40 - 13:20
Blauwe Zaal and Livestream via YouTube and Facebook
Prijs: Gratis (Student) Gratis (Anderen)

Rap music is one of the core elements of Hip Hop culture. In this episode of the ‘Minds on Music’ musical lecture series, we’ll dive into rap and its political statements throughout the years with Cultural and Media studies expert Kim Dankoor. She’ll explain in what ways rap music reflects the political, social, and economic aspects of the places in which it is created.

It’s been a long way since Grandmaster Flash’s “Don’t push me ‘cause I am close to the eddgeee” (The message, 1982 – the first political rapsong) ‘till Lil Baby in 2020: ‘It's too many mothers that's grieving; They killing us for no reason’.

A lot is being said about rap -- it’s one of - if not the most - popular musical genres worldwide. Some say it’s too much about braggin’ and boastin’ or being too sexist, yet others point to the widely spread political messages of marginalized social groups standing up to the powers that be and the female MC’s contributions to important feminist movements.

In this lecture, Kim Dankoor will focus on ‘Artists with Attitudez’: political rap expression throughout the years. From a cross-sectional, political, social and economic perspective, she’s going to dive into the relationship between rap and politics, with examples from four eras: from Grandmaster Flash’s (also N.W.A, Ice-T, etc.) political messages via gangsta rap to feministic politics (e.g., Queen Latifah,Megan Thee Stallion), to Kendrick Lamar’s ‘modern’ political messaging in rap and, of course, to  Black Lives Matters (Lil Baby).

Kim Dankoor holds a Master’s degree in Media & Culture from the Erasmus University in Rotterdam. She is currently pursuing a PhD at Utrecht University, and she focuses on Hip Hop culture and media literacy.

Brace yourself for a powerful ride in this short time. Fight the Power!  Or is it gonna be Alright?

Minds on Music

In our lecture series ‘Minds on Music’, we look at music from a alternative, scientific perspective. You can watch the previous edition where Femke Vandenberg reflects on the transition of live music to online music, focusing on the experience of the audience.

Please note: only book a ticket if you want to attend this program on campus. To watch the livestream, please do not reserve a ticket.

You can visit this program on campus or watch it online via a livestream.

On campus: ticket reservation required

This program will take place on campus for a limited number of visitors only; this number is determined by what we can accommodate according to the Covid-19 measures.  Making a reservation via the website (black "order" button) is therefore mandatory if you want to attend this program on campus.

Via livestream: do not reserve a ticket

This program will also be streamed live to our YouTube channel and Facebook page. Follow us on Facebook or subscribe to our YouTube channel to receive a notification when we go live. Please do not book a ticket if you want to watch the livestream.

SG & USE registration

  • On campus:
    Please register your participation right away when attending the program on campus. Registration can be done by scanning your student card at the venue before the start of the program.
  • Online via livestream:
    Please note: do not make a reservation if you want to watch the program online via the livestream. You can only register for SG&USE if you watch the entire program live ( i.e., you can’t watch it at a later time) and if you complete an online SG&USE registration form within five minutes after the end of the program. Before the program starts, we will explain where and when you can find the link to the registration form. You will need to have your student ID number on hand because you'll need it to fill out the form. Please make sure your registration is done properly, otherwise we will not be able to verify that you were present.

More information about SG & USE can be found here.