Lezing

Putting the sun in a box

Dr. Thomas Morgan
Woensdag 25 mei, 12:40 - 13:35 (uitverkocht)
Blauwe Zaal Auditorium

Nuclear fusion has been a long term goal for scientists and energy experts. It offers the possibility of CO2 free electricity generation from an essentially inexhaustible fuel supply, that would be safe, clean and reliable. An international group of scientists collaborates within ITER, one of the most ambitious energy research and engineering projects, to make this happen. The ITER tokamak fusion reactor in France will be the largest and most powerful fusion device in the world.

By creating a magnetic bottle in a doughnut shape, the hydrogen isotope fuel can be heated to a temperature of hundreds of millions degrees so that fusion reactions occur and release energy. One of the biggest remaining challenges for fusion to be realized is designing reactor wall materials that interact with this environment and can withstand extremely high fluxes of hot plasma particles and the neutrons produced from the fusion reaction. 

Thomas Morgan is a researcher and leader of the project Advanced Divertor Concepts at the research institute DIFFER. He investigates novel material and component designs such as liquid metals and self-healing materials to solve the heat exhaust problem for fusion power plants using the high power linear plasma generator Magnum-PSI. In this lecture, he will discuss the problems as well as the progress in designing components and solutions which can be used in a future fusion reactor.

Do you want to see the great and unique research facility Magnum-PSI in real life? Join the guided lab tour at DIFFER (TU/e campus) immediately after the lecture! We will walk to the research institute together. 

DIFFER – the Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research


Free entrance. Reservations recommended:
Subscribe here for the lecture by dr. Thomas Morgan.
Subscribe here for the guided lab tour (only for visitors of the lecture).

This program is part of the Dutch Technology Week, 23 – 28 May.